10 Days of Twitter for UOD: Day 10 Past and Future

Welcome to the last day of the 10DoTUOD!

Todays Post will be about the Past and Future of your Twitter account

The Past 

Depending on how long you have had your Twitter account, you can produce thousands of tweets! Sometimes we may want to discard and reuse a tweet.

Deleting a tweet 

You can delete your own tweets, by clicking “more” on the righthand side of your tweet, then click “delete tweet”.

If you make a mistake in a tweet, it might be less confusing to send another tweet with a correction rather than delete one that people may already have seen.

Tweet Urls 

You can save a link to individual tweets. Each tweet has its own URL. To find this, you click on “more” on the righthand side of your tweet, click “copy link to tweet”. It will take you to the URL of that individual tweet, which you can copy and paste.

You can save it, bookmark it, embed it in a website, or email it to people. However it might not be the best way to present your Tweets to someone. 

Your Twitter Archive

If you want a copy of all your tweets, then Twitter can send you an archive of everything you’ve tweeted.

  1. Click on “Profile and Settings”.
  2. Then “settings and privacy”
  3. At the bottom of the account page you will see “your twitter achieve” and Click “send email”.
  4. When you have the sent email, you will get redirected back to Twitter from a link. You can download all the information from your account, including your Tweet history in an Excel format. 

3rd Party Websites 

Storify

Using this 3rd party application is a useful way to keep tweets, especially for others. Storify is the tool which makes a narrative overview of tweets and other social media by linking to content on the web, including tweets, websites and blogs, Facebook posts, Youtube videos or photos on Flickr.

The Future: Scheduling 

Our future tweets and how to manage them?

You can schedule tweets to send themselves automatically in the Future. You can’t do this from Twitter itself, but will need to use one of the additional apps. 

Although Twitter is a medium which captures the moment, there are several reasons why you might want to schedule tweets for a later time. Not only can this save you time, it can make sure tweets are consistent and targetable to your audience. 

Hootsuite 

Using this tool can help you to preform many tasks. Scheduling is one useful feature to plan Tweets ahead. When you have signed up or logged in, you simply click on the calendar icon, write your tweet, set a time and date and click schedule. #Simple 

Ten Days of Twitter for Learning Developers was originally adapted from a similar programme for STEM researchers, also created by Helen Webster. The materials are available under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA.

Ten Days of Twitter has been adapted by Technology Enhanced Learningfor use at UOD, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License.

We are extremely grateful for the work put in by Helen Webster, the LD5Digital Things team and the University of Sussex’s Technology Enhanced Learning Team, and for sharing their great resources with the community!

 

 

10 Days of Twitter for UOD: Day 9 Managing Information

Welcome to day 9 of 10 Days of Twitter for UOD

Todays video is all about how to keep track of the interesting tweets and links to webpages etc which you might want to follow up on.


Twitter itself has a few features which can help you stay on top of all the information.

Favourites

If you see a tweet which interests you and which you’d like to come back to later, you can mark it as a ‘favourite’ and it will be stored for you to return to. To mark a tweet as a ‘favourite’, hover over the tweet, and a star icon will appear below it, along with ‘retweet’ and some other functions.

Search

You can also search for tweets, by username, hashtag or just by a keyword. The search box is at the top of the screen in the right hand corner. You can also organise the search results by top (most popular) topics, all results, or limit the results just to the people you follow. Once you have searched, a small ‘settings’ cog icon will appear next to the ‘search’ box (not the main cog icon at the top right of the screen!). If this is a search you might repeat regularly, click on this, and you can save the search so you don’t need to keep performing it – useful if you’re following a hash tagged discussion. You could also perform an advanced search using this icon- you can narrow down the tweets you’re looking for by word or by the person sending or receiving it, or by location.

Trending

In the left hand column, Twitter will also show you what hashtags are popular at the moment. This may or may not be of much use to you! You can narrow the trends down by location, by clicking on ‘Change’ in this box, but if you are networking at a national or international level, this may not be very helpful.

Ten Days of Twitter for Learning Developers was originally adapted from a similar programme for STEM researchers, also created by Helen Webster. The materials are available under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA.

Ten Days of Twitter has been adapted by Technology Enhanced Learningfor use at UOD, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License.

We are extremely grateful for the work put in by Helen Webster, the LD5Digital Things team and the University of Sussex’s Technology Enhanced Learning Team, and for sharing their great resources with the community!

10 Days of Twitter for UOD: Day 8 Managing People

Welcome to day 8! Today you will be learning about Managing People on your Twitter account. 

So hopefully you have gained a larger following since day 1, and now want  to segment these accounts into lists. 

You might want to group the people you follow based on your relationship with them, Some examples might be:

  • Services at your institution
  • Colleagues and peers 
  • Professional or funding bodies
  • News accounts
  • Social, personal or fun accounts

Twitter Lists

Twitter has a feature which allows you to make lists of people. These lists can be private, so only you and others added into the list can see them, or they might be public so you can share them with others.

To create a list:

  1. Go to the gear icon at the top right of the page.
  2. Select ‘Lists’
  3. On the left of the screen Click on ‘Create list’
  4. Add a name and a brief description about the list being created. This description will be very helpful if you decide to make the list public, so others can find and subscribe to it.

Adding members to your list: 

  1. You will now be invited to search for people to add to your list. You can also add them later, by clicking on their @name and going to their profile.
  2. Next to the “Follow” button, you will see another icon called “more user actions”.
  3. If you click on this, you will see a menu containing the option ‘add or remove from lists’, then simply add an account to your list! #simple 

Other 3rd Party Apps

  1. Tweetdeck: Owned by Twitter, useful to manage more than one account. For example personal and professional use. 
  2. Hootsuite: A  similar application to Tweetdeck, but allows you to also import other social media accounts such as Facebook and Instagram. Unlike Tweetdeck, it can be downloaded as an app for mobile devices. 

If you are interested in learning more about these tools watch some how to videos on youtube 🙂 

10 Days of Twitter UOD: Day 7 Hashtags

Welcome to 10 Days of Twitter UOD Day 7! 

Today we are learning about how and why we should hashtag content

What are the benefits of Hashtagging?

Basically, the hashtag is a form of metadata. A # in front of a word signals that it is a keyword of some sort, tagging that tweet with a hash symbol (hence hash-tag). This means that you can easily search for all other tweets by other people containing that word similarly marked with a hashtag symbol. In fact, you don’t even need to search – if you click on any hashtagged term, it will search for you.

How do you think Hashtagging is useful?

Hashtags really come in useful in academia in three ways.

  • An open, extended discussion
  • Livechat
  • Livetweeting

In this short video, it will show you how to hashtag as well as examples of content that could be hashtagged.

Ten Days of Twitter for Learning Developers was originally adapted from a similar programme for STEM researchers, also created by Helen Webster. The materials are available under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA.

Ten Days of Twitter has been adapted by Technology Enhanced Learning for use at UOD, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License.

We are extremely grateful for the work put in by Helen Webster, the LD5Digital Things team and the University of Sussex’s Technology Enhanced Learning Team, and for sharing their great resources with the community!

10 Days of Twitter UOD Day 6: Retweeting

Welcome to 10 Days of Twitter UOD Day 6! 

Today we are learning about how and why we should retweet content

What are the benefits of Retweeting?

  • Gives us more enriching content 
  • Gain a good reputation 
  • Followers may find the retweeted content beneficial 
  • Larger accounts who originally tweeted the post you retweeted might pay attention to your account 

How do I Retweet?

At the bottom of every tweet, there are various buttons. We are specifically looking for the one with two arrows, which should also say right next it to “Retweet”. 

We are then given an option to add a comment (which could make the post more visible) or to straightforward Retweet. 

In this short video, it will show you how to retweet as well as examples of content that could be retweeted. 

Ten Days of Twitter for Learning Developers was originally adapted from a similar programme for STEM researchers, also created by Helen Webster. The materials are available under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA.

Ten Days of Twitter has been adapted by Technology Enhanced Learning for use at UOD, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License.

We are extremely grateful for the work put in by Helen Webster, the LD5Digital Things team and the University of Sussex’s Technology Enhanced Learning Team, and for sharing their great resources with the community!

10 Days of Twitter UOD Day 5: Shortening URLs

Welcome to day 5 of 10 Days of Twitter for UOD

Todays video is all about how to shorten URLs and what websites are available to help us achieve this for free. 

Even though Twitter automatically shortens the URL, this sometime just isn’t enough. Therefore we might want to shorten it further so there is more room in our 140 character tweet box. 

So what websites can I use to shorten URLs? 

  1. Tinyurl: http://tinyurl.com
  2. goo.gl URLs: Created by  google you can shorten URLs, track analytics and learn more about your audience https://goo.gl
  3. Bit.ly which can also track click-throughs https://bitly.com

So why might we shorten URLs? 

  • A news story
  • A conference or funding call that’s been announced
  • Books or articles 
  • Blog posts 
  • Slides or other material from a presentation from Univeristy 
  • Videos on Youtube or Vimeo, this again could be from University  
  • Your own publications about research 

10 Days of Twitter UOD Day 4: @ Message

Welcome to day 4 of 10 Days of Twitter for UOD. Today we will be discussing @ messages and why you might use them in your Twitter.

Watch the video below to learn about how to compose @messages in your own Twitter account.  

So when might I use @ Messages? 

  • When replying to or responding to a tweets. 
  • Asking a question
  • Message followed accounts that might be interested in certain information 
  • To get attention from an account. An example of this could be , if you retweet one of their tweets or are talking about their work

How do I send @Messages? 

1)You can either simply put @ at the start of your tweet and write the account name. 

2) You can go into a profile and press Tweet To…  which is found under the Bio. By doing this the @name will automatically appear in the tweet box.  

Ten Days of Twitter for Learning Developers was originally adapted from a similar programme for STEM researchers, also created by Helen Webster. The materials are available under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA.

Ten Days of Twitter has been adapted by Technology Enhanced Learning for use at UOD, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License.

We are extremely grateful for the work put in by Helen Webster, the LD5Digital Things team and the University of Sussex’s Technology Enhanced Learning Team, and for sharing their great resources with the community!

10 Days of Twitter UOD Day 3: Who to Follow

Welcome to Day 3 of 10DoT UOD, today we will show you who to follow in this short video.

How many people you follow is entirely up to you, however you need a sufficient number to ensure a useful stream of content. It is vital to follow relevant people or organisations that link to your topic, as it may give you inspiration for tweets; analysing other accounts. 

 

So who do I follow? 

Here are a list of suggestions to increase your following list.

  1. Celebrities or well known people in the media that share the same interests
  2. Professional Bodies For updates about events, news, policy, or funding opportunities. Follow Institutes or Colleges representing your discipline
  3. Charities 
  4. Colleagues or Student peers
  5. Policy makers: Individual politicians or policies that have been created in the UK e.g. Government department for Education. Or even other official bodies. 
  6. Academics this could be from University?  
  7. Businesses related to your profile , for example Samsung if you like technology.  

Remember just because you follow a profile, following is not necessarily reciprocal. Sometimes it can take time to increase your own following. Therefore, posting frequently, writing enriching content as well as concentrating on factors such as the appearance can dramatically impact on the growth of your page.  

 

Ten Days of Twitter for Learning Developers was originally adapted from a similar programme for STEM researchers, also created by Helen Webster. The materials are available under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA.

Ten Days of Twitter has been adapted by Technology Enhanced Learningfor use at UOD, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License.

We are extremely grateful for the work put in by Helen Webster, the LD5Digital Things team and the University of Sussex’s Technology Enhanced Learning Team, and for sharing their great resources with the community!

10 Days of Twitter UOD Day 2: How to Write a Tweet

Welcome to Day 2! of 10 Days of Twitter for the University of Derby

This video will demonstrate how to produce and write content for your Twitter profile.

Some Examples found in the video:

  1. Write a simple message, this could be about what you are doing and if you are going to any relevant events. 
  2. Crowd Source, asking and engaging our audience in a poll. 
  3.  Using daily Trends to see what people are interested in. Use hashtags and writing content about the top trends from the home page, if they are relevant to you.  
  4. Retweet a piece of content that is appropriate and interesting for your audience. 
  5. Links from a website or page, that you again find is useful and interesting. 

Other examples: 

  1. Live tweet an event, which is tweeted for a certain amount of time. 
  2. Send Direct Messages (DM) to someone privately about your chosen topic. 
  3. @ message directed to someone. Ask someone a question, comment or reply to a tweet. 

Tip: Remember to use hashtags # and @name to connect with other profiles on Twitter in Tweets. 

 

Ten Days of Twitter for Learning Developers was originally adapted from a similar programme for STEM researchers, also created by Helen Webster. The materials are available under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA.

Ten Days of Twitter has been adapted by Technology Enhanced Learning for use at UOD, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License.

We are extremely grateful for the work put in by Helen Webster, the LD5Digital Things team and the University of Sussex’s Technology Enhanced Learning Team, and for sharing their great resources with the community!

10 Days of Twitter UOD: How to make an account and profile

Welcome to the the 10 Days of Twitter for University of Derby

Over the next 10 working days, we will show you how to create a professional Twitter account/profile, and how to make this effective as as a student or member of staff.

Twitter is a social media platform, that Is well known and used to microblog about various topics. However, many businesses and individuals are using Twitter to established and promote themselves on.  With over 300 million monthly active users on twitter, it can be a useful tool for anyone to use.  

Day 1: How to make a Twitter Profile 

This short video will teach you how to make a Twitter account. With all the basics of how to get started to make your profile look more attractive and professional. Starting a Twitter account can therefore be a useful tool, especially whilst at University, after when you have graduated or even as a member of staff. 

 

Ten Days of Twitter for Learning Developers was originally adapted from a similar programme for STEM researchers, also created by Helen Webster. The materials are available under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA.

Ten Days of Twitter has been adapted by Technology Enhanced Learning for use at UOD, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License.

We are extremely grateful for the work put in by Helen Webster, the LD5Digital Things team and the University of Sussex’s Technology Enhanced Learning Team, and for sharing their great resources with the community!